The Trouble with Time Travel — a presentation about designers working one Sprint ahead of developers on Agile projects

Many UX practitioners own their own TARDIS – it’s the pattern many of us have adopted so designers can work with development teams using Agile methods by designing up-front and then working behind to iterate the designs. While some suggest that its best practice, does it actually reap the benefits that Agile has to offer? What are its pitfalls, what are the advantages and disadvantages compared to just doing up-front design, and are there any smarter ways of becoming agile, whether working solo, in design teams, or working on end-to-end projects?
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This presentation was given at WebDU 2012 in Sydney, with a second iteration given at Agile Australia 2012 in Melbourne.
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