Evidenced Based Management – Measuring value to enable improvement and Business Agility

Organisations invest in agile processes, tools, training, and coaching, but how much are they getting back? Has product delivery improved? How much happier are users and the business customers? Are employees empowered and enabled?
Traditional metrics might give you insight into improvements of operational efficiency, but the real conversation is about the value created for your organisation by the improved processes. Without measuring value, the success of any agile initiative is based on nothing more than intuition and assumption.


In my presentation at Scrum Australia 24 Oct 2018, I discuss Evidence Based Management (EBM)  and how this empirical process can help agile transformations measure and manage the value derived from the initiative.


EBM is an empirical approach that provides organisations with the ability to measure the value they deliver to customers and the means by which they deliver that value, and to use those measures to guide improvements in both. The framework has four Key Value Areas (KVAs) : Current Value, Ability to Innovate, Unrealised Value and Time to Market. Each KVA focuses on an aspect fo delivering Value or the ability to deliver Value.




Measuring activity just tells where time was spent, not whether value was produced, Value is the reason why we do things; activity and output do not tell you whether what you are doing is worthwhile or successful.

Success = value is maximised therefore need to focus on outcomes, not actvity and output. Need to undersatnd what value did we delivered and what was the behaviour change or increased outcome. Without measuring value, the success of any agile initiative is based on nothing more than intuition and assumption.

Here is my full presentation

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